The Chemistry of Essential Oils and Artificial Perfumes - by Ernest J Parry

By Ernest J Parry

Quantity 2 (of the 2 quantity set): part titles are ...(1) the basic Oil and Its scent ...(2) ingredients of crucial Oils, artificial Perfumes and remoted Aromatics ...(3) The research of crucial Oils.

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The Chemistry of Essential Oils and Artificial Perfumes - Volume 2 (Fourth Edition)

Quantity 2 (of the 2 quantity set): part titles are . .. (1) the basic Oil and Its smell . .. (2) elements of crucial Oils, man made Perfumes and remoted Aromatics . .. (3) The research of crucial Oils.

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Volatile) and which reacts chemically with substances in the mucous membrane of the nose stimulating the nose nerves. Haller 2 also considers that the action is undoubtedly of a chemical nature and that the odoriferous molecule undergoes a change of some kind. That odoriferous bodies must undergo a change in the nose follows from the simple fact that the sensation only lasts for a short while after the removal of the source of odour. The substances in the mucus membrane by means of which the odoriferous body is " fixed " are termed " osmoceptors " by Euzicka.

I. 607. ODOUK AND CHEMICAL CONSTITUTION 27 its compounds in proportion as its electrons are more firmly united to the atomic nucleus. While there is little reason seriously to consider Teudt's first conception, yet there is some justification for his second one, because the osmophoric elements are all grouped together in the periodic table and are therefore likely to have a fundamental common characteristic. Of historical interest is Tyndall's observation,1 made so long ago as 1865, that gases with an odour possess the power of absorbing radiant heat to a marked degree.

2 By oxidation of d- and Z-pinene of high rotatory power, Barbier and Grignard obtained the optically active forms of pinonic acid. Z-pinene from French turpentine oil (boiling-point 155° to 157°, aD - 37'2°; 157° to 160°, aD - 32'3°) was oxidised with permanganate. From the product of oxidation, which (after elimination of the volatile acids and of nopinic acid) boiled at 189° to 195° under 18 mm. pressure, Z-pinonic acid separated out in long crystalline needles, which, after recrystallisation from a mixture of ether and petroleum ether, melted at 67° to 69°.

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