Behind Bars: Latino/as and Prison in the United States by S. Oboler

By S. Oboler

This ebook addresses the advanced factor of incarceration of Latino/as and provides a entire assessment of such themes as deportations in historic context, a case examine of latino/a resistance to prisons within the 70s, the problems of stripling and and women prisons, and the publish incarceration experience.

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New York: Hill and Wang. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2002. Results from the 2001 national household survey on drug abuse: Volume 1. Summary of national findings. NHSDA Series H-17, DHHS Publication No. SMA 02-3758. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies. Tonry, Michael. 2005. Maligned neglect: Race, crime and punishment in America. New York: Oxford University Press. Travis, Jeremy. 2005. But they all come back: Facing the challenges of prisoner reentry. : Urban Institute Press.

2000. S. federal courts: Who is punished more harshly? American Sociological Review 65:705–29. ———. 2001. Ethnicity and judges’ sentencing decisions: Hispanic-black-white comparisons. Criminology 39:145–78. Stephanson, Anders. 1995. Manifest destiny: American expansion and the empire of right. New York: Hill and Wang. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2002. Results from the 2001 national household survey on drug abuse: Volume 1. Summary of national findings. NHSDA Series H-17, DHHS Publication No.

S. PRISONS 23 Reports issued by the New York State Attorney General and the United States Commission on Civil Rights have provided additional evidence that in New York City, race has frequently been used as the sole criterion in the acts committed by law enforcement agents, making evermore apparent the problem of racial profiling as it affects Latino/as (Spitzer 1999; United States Commission on Civil Rights 2000). The New York City Police Department insisted that the reason Latino/as and African Americans were stopped and frisked at higher rates was because they live in high crime-rate neighborhoods.

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